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Fri, Mar 06, 2015

Twitter: GreatFireChina RT @HeathaT: Apple’s "selfishness and greed may put their customers & everyone’s customers at great risk.” @GreatFireChina to @qz http://t… retweet

Thu, Mar 05, 2015

Twitter: GreatFireChina How you can help demolish the Great Firewall of China from the comfort of your living room http://t.co/gsjDtZWOdT via @dailydot retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina "To bring back the blue skies over China, the political monopoly must be lifted too." Smog as a Political Analogy: http://t.co/aaAo5DaVZk retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina Apple’s capitulation to China undermines Obama’s tough talk on snooping http://t.co/ZMxZJjl688 via @qz retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina Interesting strategy to "poison the well" that Chinese hackers drink from http://t.co/AyCgrsy8iF via @CFR_org h/t @niubi retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina From the ONION, Chinese Citizens Kind Of Grateful To Not Have Access To All Of Internet http://t.co/thxNVZsTGD via @TheOnion retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina Connect your VPNs to the UK and enjoy a free viewing of Citizen Four http://t.co/pOBtTZNsci #CitizenFour retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina Building backdoors into encryption isn't only bad for China, Mr President http://t.co/KkrJnajzFk retweet

Wed, Mar 04, 2015

Twitter: GreatFireChina Google 财经测试版提供下列版本 https://t.co/cqKc533SBa retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina RT @craigtimberg: Beware the "FREAK" flaw, a "zombie from the '90s" to remind us of perils of govt ordered security holes. http://t.co/Vy4kretweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina RT @ChuBailiang: In Changsha, China, a replica of David, and a tourist unafraid to uphold core Western values: http://t.co/Hu58MjXlej http:… retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina RT @cctvnews: #NPC spokeswoman on Obama’s criticism of counter-terrorism law: Even Western gov'ts & US have often requested companies for e… retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina How China uses J-visas to punish international media for critical coverage http://t.co/MQltK6vdKV
via @pressfreedom retweet
Twitter: GreatFireChina RT @chengr28: RevokeChinaCerts 的 Android 版本在 @phoeagon 的帮助下(其实全是他搞的我基本没搞过……正式发布了,大家可以去试试哦,使用说明在 README.md 里 https://t.co/OhSylJNrkP http://… retweet

Mon, Jan 26, 2015

An Open Letter to Lu Wei and the Cyberspace Administration of China

January 26, 2015

Beijing, China

 

Mr. Lu Wei

Director of the Cyberspace Administration of the People’s Republic of China 中央网络安全和信息化领导小组办公室主任

Director of the State Internet Information Office 国家互联网信息办公室主任

Deputy Director of the Central Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party 中共中央宣传部副部长

Cyberspace Administration of China,

Floor 1, Building 1,

Software Park, Chinese Academy of Sciences,

4 South 4th Street, Zhongguancun,

Beijing, China, 100190

 

Dear Mr. Lu,

On January 22, 2015, the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), which is under your direct control, wrote a response to a story we published about an MITM attack on Microsoft. In the post, your colleague, Jiang Jun, labelled our accusations as "groundless" and  "unsupported speculation, a pure slanderous act by overseas anti-China forces".

We at GreatFire.org take great offense to these comments and we will refute them in this letter.

Mon, Jan 19, 2015

Outlook grim - Chinese authorities attack Microsoft

On January 17, we received reports that Microsoft’s email system, Outlook (which was merged with Hotmail in 2013), was subjected to a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack in China.

The following screenshot shows what happens when a Chinese user accesses Outlook via an email client (in this case, Ice-dove):

We have tested Outlook to verify the attack and have produced the same results. IMAP and SMTP for Outlook were under a MITM attack. Do note however that the web interfaces (https://outlook.com and https://login.live.com/ ) were not affected. The attack lasted for about a day and has now ceased.

This form of attack is especially devious because the warning messages users receive from their email clients are much less noticeable than the warning messages delivered to modern browsers (see screenshot at the end of this post for comparison).

(Sample error message from default iPhone mail client)

Fri, Jan 09, 2015

GFW upgrade fail - visitors to blocked sites redirected to porn

In the past, the Chinese authorities’ DNS poisoning system would direct Chinese internet users who were trying to access Facebook, Twitter and other blocked websites (without the use of a circumvention tool) to a set of fake IP addresses that are blocked in China or are non-existent. After waiting for some time, Chinese internet users would receive a timeout message if they were trying to access a blocked site.

However, with the new DNS poisoning system, in addition to those IP addresses used before, the Chinese authorities are using real IP addresses that actually host websites and are accessible in China. For example, https://support.dnspod.cn/Tools/tools/ shows that if a user tries to access Facebook from China, they might instead land on a random web page, e.g. http://178.62.75.99

Below is a screenshot by a Chinese user when he was trying to access our GreatFire.org website which was blocked in China. He was redirected to a goverment site in Korea. In essense, GFW is sending Chinese users to DDOS the Korea government's website.

One Chinese Internet user reported to us that when he tried to access Facebook in China, he was sent to a Russian website, unrelated to Facebook. Another user tweeted that he was redirected to an German adult site when he tried to access a website for a VPN.

某墙你这什么意思,DNS 污染返回给我一个德国工口站的 IP,满屏很黄很暴力弹弹弹(

— nil (@xierch) January 4, 2015

Wed, Dec 31, 2014

CNNIC leadership change coincides with blocking of Gmail

On December 26, 2014, in an announcement posted on their website, a new chairperson for CNNIC was directly appointed by the Cyberspace Administration of China. The announcement of this appointment coincided with the complete blocking of Gmail.

Cyberspace Administration of China (中央网信办) is chaired by Lu Wei, “China’s web doorkeeper”. Lu Wei is also the vice chair of the Central Propaganda Department, according to his official resume.

chair.png

This office is directly responsible for the blocking of Gmail and other websites including Facebook, Twitter and Google.

CNNIC is China’s certification authority and operates the country’s domain name registry. 

What are certificates used for?

Certificates are used primarily to verify the identity of a person or device, authenticate a service, or encrypt files. 

What is a certification authority (CA)?  

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